Three Dark Crowns-Kendare Blake

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Three dark queens

are born in a glen,

sweet little triplets

will never be friends

Three dark sisters

all fair to be seen ,

two to devour

and one to be Queen

So begins Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake. It is a dark read, set in a mythical island of Fennbirn where the only way to become a queen, is by killing the other two sisters of a set of triplets. Each of the triplets is born with a gift- either power over the five elements, or over the nature or a poisoner who can stomach all kinds of poison; and only the strongest of the three will become the queen.

The Three Dark Crowns has a very intriguing concept of royalty and crown, where instead of the first born being a natural heir to the throne, the triplets are all an equal heir to the crown, you just have to be willing to kill the other two sisters in a fair game. I have been on a look out for a good series for a long while now and I think I have found it in this series by Kendare Blake.

Her writing flows easily, but grips you in the story almost immediately from the first chapter. I don’t care much for lot of flowery descriptions of the surroundings, but almost nothing about the people in the book, it is the character development is very important and Kendare achieves that superbly. All the characters from the suitors Billy and Pietyr, the foster families of Arrons, Milones and Westwood to the queens, Mirabella, Arsinoe and Katharine, is written about beautifully. A small scene involving Sara Westwood was so well written that you could gauge her character in couple of paragraphs.

I will recommend this book to anyone who likes fantasy genre and wants to read something unconventional. I cannot wait to read the next one in the series: One Dark Throne.

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Norse Mythology: Neil Gaiman

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I have to admit, it was the cover that attracted me first to this book; second was the name-Norse Mythology and finally Neil Gaiman as the author convinced me that I should read it! And I am glad I did! I don’t know much about Norse Mythology at all, but I have definitely heard of Asgard and of Thor and his legendary hammer.

Before I started reading it, I was expecting the book to flow like the usual fictional novel in a linear pattern; but now that I have finished it, I agree that the small short stories was a better way to go. The book starts by introducing the usual players, then goes on to describe the beginnings, how Thor got his hammer and then the other stories which display the slyness of Loki, the stubbornness of Thor, and general the fickle nature of gods, ending with the end of the world.

As the book is written in short stories you can take breaks while reading but the book in general is pretty unstoppable once you start reading it. What I found very fascinating was even in the times when gods walked the earth, the characteristics of good and evil, weakness and strength, compassion and greed are timeless. Even the gods are not above these traits, and are not above death and mortality-even though they do tend to come back from the dead sometimes.

I love books on mythology because they make me think that maybe these ancient times did exist, who is to deny or accept that claim. Just as maybe Mahabharata existed in ancient old worlds, so did Norse gods. Maybe over time people have not forgotten their deeds, but because they seem so much larger than human lives, people have conveniently decided that this must be all mythology and legends; but who is to say that the legends did not exist years and years ago?