Norse Mythology: Neil Gaiman

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I have to admit, it was the cover that attracted me first to this book; second was the name-Norse Mythology and finally Neil Gaiman as the author convinced me that I should read it! And I am glad I did! I don’t know much about Norse Mythology at all, but I have definitely heard of Asgard and of Thor and his legendary hammer.

Before I started reading it, I was expecting the book to flow like the usual fictional novel in a linear pattern; but now that I have finished it, I agree that the small short stories was a better way to go. The book starts by introducing the usual players, then goes on to describe the beginnings, how Thor got his hammer and then the other stories which display the slyness of Loki, the stubbornness of Thor, and general the fickle nature of gods, ending with the end of the world.

As the book is written in short stories you can take breaks while reading but the book in general is pretty unstoppable once you start reading it. What I found very fascinating was even in the times when gods walked the earth, the characteristics of good and evil, weakness and strength, compassion and greed are timeless. Even the gods are not above these traits, and are not above death and mortality-even though they do tend to come back from the dead sometimes.

I love books on mythology because they make me think that maybe these ancient times did exist, who is to deny or accept that claim. Just as maybe Mahabharata existed in ancient old worlds, so did Norse gods. Maybe over time people have not forgotten their deeds, but because they seem so much larger than human lives, people have conveniently decided that this must be all mythology and legends; but who is to say that the legends did not exist years and years ago?

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Our Moon has Blood Clots-Rahul Pandita

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This was not an easy book to read and it is certainly not easy to review. It isn’t a story which you read in your free time and forget about it. It is a personal memoir of the exile of Kashmiri Pandits-a Hindu minority in a Muslim majority Kashmir valley. It is the story of how systematically Kashmiri Pandits were forced to flee their homes leaving everything behind, carrying with them only the hope that someday they will return back to their ancestral lands. In a matter of fact style, Rahul Pandita recounts the names of his pandit neighbors, family and friends who were forced to flee or killed or worse. It cannot have been easy to recount those terrifying days of childhood, but the author does it without any drama and fanfare. The recount of the cold January night in 1990 when the neighbourhood mosques start the anti-India and Azadi (freedom) slogans was terrifying to read. It is impossible to imagine the fear of the parents with 2 young children when they hear the mob outside their house shout out messages about turning Kashmir into Pakistan with the help of pandit women.

Ever line you read hits you, because these are not just random names you are reading on the page of a book; these are real people, names with faces who once had dreams and lives same as you; the lives that were snuffed or irrevocably changed in the name of religion and ethnic cleansing. No it is not an easy book to read, but it has to be read to realize that human beings are not really human. History has shown us that time and again, human beings will kill and maim each other at the slightest excuse. Sometimes for land, sometimes for god and sometimes for the power; the excuses change but the outcome doesn’t.

Like most refugees, the Pandits will also probably will never return back home; and if they do what will they return back to; terror and discrimination or peace?

Hammered-Kevin Hearne

Hammered by Kevin Hearne is the third book in The Iron Druid Chronicles. The concept of an Irish Druid and all the related mythologies fascinated me when I started the first book Hounded. It was interesting enough that I immediately went ahead and read the second one Hexed. But somewhere by the time the second book ended, I lost my interest in the series. I picked up this third book Hammered just because I saw it in my Goodreads feed and wanted to give the series another shot.

Hammered starts right off the bat with Atticus’s crazy trip to Asgard. He somehow makes it back to Tempe but not before causing some serious damage. It seems like his thousands of years of quiet existence is about to end and nothing will be the same from here on. He has agreed to take Leif Helgarson to Asgard to get his revenge on Thor-thunder god. They meet up with additional powerful beings on the way, each one of whom has their own reasons for being on this crazy trip to kill the thunder god.

The story flows well enough and is very readable if you ignore the little incongruent details. I think there was no reason to include that scene with Jesus and the Hammer of God. Yes it was important to include that warning, but I am sure the author could have delivered it in a different way. I think that’s when it started to get a little too far fetched for me. It was pretty naïve for Atticus to think that all he was doing was helping Leif get to Asgard and that he wouldn’t be required to fight! I agree that he was doing was keeping his word to his friend, but his reactons seemed very naïve in most situations.

My favorite bits have always been Atticus’s conversations with Oberon and his interactions with Granuaile. It makes me wish I had a pet with whom I could communicate in private, how much fun would that be! I felt the action scenes were written well and the picture in my mind of Atticus wielding his sword makes me sigh happily! Overall the story flowed well enough to keep me entertained. The end of this book intrigued me enough to keep going with the series for now.